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Absinthe
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Author:  JeffAlso [ Fri Dec 21, 2007 8:19 pm ]
Post subject:  Absinthe

After a 97 year ban, as of today Absinthe is now completely legal in the US!

On Thursday, December 27th, Surdyk's becomes the first retailer in Minnesota to sell the infamous and often misunderstood Absinthe Liqueur....

Doors opening early to the curious public at 8:00 a.m. for those seeking the first dibs on Lucid Absinthe. The first 50 adventurous customers will receive a free, silver absinthe spoon to concoct their drinks in the traditional way.

It should cost about $65-70 per bottle. Time to dance with the green fairy!!

Author:  rskm1 [ Fri Dec 21, 2007 8:26 pm ]
Post subject: 

Image I'm ready!

Author:  JeffAlso [ Fri Dec 21, 2007 8:43 pm ]
Post subject: 

I'm thinking something a little more like <a href='http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tWyDxiOz70&NR=1' target='_blank'>this</a>...

Author:  polter [ Fri Dec 21, 2007 8:53 pm ]
Post subject: 

About time........
I'll go to Surdyk's and get a bottle. What is the traditional way to drink this stuff? I couldn't really tell what was going on in the video. It looked like that had it under a leaky faucet. until then.......... pass the scotch

Author:  JeffAlso [ Fri Dec 21, 2007 9:17 pm ]
Post subject: 

You're supposed to put a sugarcube on an Absinthe spoon and dissolve it by dripping ice cold water thru the sugar into the glass. Keep dripping water until you have 2-4 times as much water as liqueur. The color should change from green to milky during the process.

The video shows an absinthe fountain ($200-400), but simply pooring the water as slowly as possible works just fine too.

Author:  thosquanta [ Fri Dec 21, 2007 9:27 pm ]
Post subject: 

the stuff at surdyks does not contain tijone (sp?) and costs $60/bottle.

Author:  JeffAlso [ Fri Dec 21, 2007 9:58 pm ]
Post subject: 

thosquanta wrote:
the stuff at surdyks does not contain tijone (sp?) and costs $60/bottle.

Nope. As of today, 'real' absinthe is now <a href='http://www.oxygenee.com/absinthe-america/legalization.html' target='_blank'>legal</a> and available for sale in the US. <a href='http://www.drinklucid.com/lucid_home.cfm' target='_blank'>Lucid Absinthe</a>, the one available at Surdyks on Thurs is a true wormwood based Absinthe with ~10 mg/liter of thujone, which is on par with levels prior to 1912, as well as whats available in Europe today.

Author:  devil [ Fri Dec 21, 2007 10:11 pm ]
Post subject: 

Not a particularly great tasting liquor (liqueur), and its effects have been greatly exaggerated for generations, you'll find it a bit of a letdown most likely.

Part of the ritual involves the wait. Dripping the water in slowly, drop by drop, over the sugarcube, as the green fairy slowly takes shape.

Author:  urbn [ Sat Dec 22, 2007 12:01 am ]
Post subject: 

I thought the one that they were making available only had 1/10th of the standard real Absinthe you could normally make.

Author:  JeffAlso [ Sat Dec 22, 2007 1:40 am ]
Post subject: 

I think your thinking of <a href='http://www.absente.com/' target='_blank'>Absente</a> and the like. These are knockoffs that have been sold here in the US while the real stuff was illegal. They use Southernwood rather than Wormwood, and contain no thujone, which had previously been banned entirely. The amount of thujone allowed is now the same as it is in Europe (10ppm), which makes any 'real' absinthe legal in the US, including those from the Belle Époque period.

While thujone is an extremely mild hallucinogen, its nothing on the scale of LSD or shrooms. Drinking it causes a slightly different effect than normal alcohol, but it's very subtle. I think its sort of like drinking alcohol with a mild opium buzz - something a little bit different and more interesting than alcohol alone, but nothing really overwhelming.

Author:  thosquanta [ Sat Dec 22, 2007 3:04 am ]
Post subject: 

hey, thanks for the info!

cool cool.


me, i like the taste. im one of those wierdos that likes black licorice.

Author:  Jason Guana [ Sat Dec 22, 2007 4:20 am ]
Post subject: 

JeffAlso wrote:
the one available at Surdyks on Thurs is a true wormwood based Absinthe with ~10 mg/liter of thujone, which is on par with levels prior to 1912, as well as whats available in Europe today.


Thanks for the info. There were obvious ways around this law. Hopefully, this will drive the prices down. Shipping from Czechia is a pain.

JT

Author:  JeffAlso [ Sat Dec 22, 2007 12:40 pm ]
Post subject: 

Actually, it's hard to find a 'genuine' absinthe from the Czech Republic unless you go out of your way. The majority produced in Czechia are considered 'Bohemian-style', 'Czech-style', or 'Czechsinth'. Most of these leave out the 'e', and label their product 'Absinth'.

Czechsinth is produced by using using a previously distilled grain alcohol, diluting with water, and adding the extracts of some of the herbs used in real absinthe production. Real absinthe includes the actual herbs during the distillation process, which is what defines it as an herbal liqueur. Czech-style absinthe also doesn't louche when water is introduced (although it may appear to when sugar is added), and includes artificial coloring rather than using anise to produce the green color.

You can effectively make the same product by ordering the herbal extracts online and mixing them into diluted grain alcohol or a high quality vodka. It will contain thujone if you add wormwood extract, but it can't be considered 'real' absinthe. Despite the shortcuts in the production process, Czechsinth is still considerebly better than the knockoffs that have been sold here in the US.

With the introduction of Lucid, we finally have the real deal :)

Author:  Jason Guana [ Sat Dec 22, 2007 10:04 pm ]
Post subject: 

JeffAlso wrote:
Actually, it's hard to find a 'genuine' absinthe from the Czech Republic unless you go out of your way. The majority produced in Czechia are considered 'Bohemian-style', 'Czech-style', or 'Czechsinth'. Most of these leave out the 'e', and label their product 'Absinth'.

Czechsinth is produced by using using a previously distilled grain alcohol, diluting with water, and adding the extracts of some of the herbs used in real absinthe production. Real absinthe includes the actual herbs during the distillation process, which is what defines it as an herbal liqueur. Czech-style absinthe also doesn't louche when water is introduced (although it may appear to when sugar is added), and includes artificial coloring rather than using anise to produce the green color.

You can effectively make the same product by ordering the herbal extracts online and mixing them into diluted grain alcohol or a high quality vodka. It will contain thujone if you add wormwood extract, but it can't be considered 'real' absinthe. Despite the shortcuts in the production process, Czechsinth is still considerebly better than the knockoffs that have been sold here in the US.

With the introduction of Lucid, we finally have the real deal :)


'Tis sweet music to my slavonic soul. Thanks again for posting this. :wink:

JT

Author:  eiregirl [ Sun Dec 23, 2007 12:43 am ]
Post subject: 

nametag, her sister and i created some rather tasty absinthe smoothies with a bottle nametag had from europe.

Author:  petey [ Sun Dec 23, 2007 3:58 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Absinthe

JeffAlso wrote:
The first 50 adventurous customers will receive a free, silver absinthe spoon to concoct their drinks in the traditional way.


My gramma must habe been one hucuva party animal!

She left me her absinthe spoon...

Author:  Haakon [ Sun Dec 23, 2007 5:41 pm ]
Post subject: 

Well, hopefully, somebody who buys this stuff can give the info on how good it is.

Author:  urbn [ Mon Dec 24, 2007 12:02 am ]
Post subject: 

No I know the difference between Absente and Absinthe. I've been making my own Absinthe and ordering it online for a while :)

While I was out in Seattle they were selling Absinthe but with almost no thujone (1/50th). It was sold for a few months before I guess if finally became lega.

"it's hard to find a 'genuine' absinthe from the Czech Republic "


http://www.google.com/search?q=Absinthe+Czech+

It has never been hard on anything besides the wallet

Author:  JeffAlso [ Mon Dec 24, 2007 4:02 am ]
Post subject: 

I wasn't saying that its hard to find, but that the stuff from the Czech republic (currently all 15 major brands) isn't actually absinthe. It's grain alcohol with some herbal additives and coloring mixed in. It's like powdered milk or instant coffee, only that the primary ingredient (anise) is actually left out. They quite often don't even contain the ingredients or thujone levels that they advertise, since it's completely unregulated.

Adding wormwood extract to grain alcohol doesn't make it absinthe any more than adding grape juice will make it wine. Lotsa people (myself included) have been conned into thinking the stuff from the Czech Republic is the real deal, when its actually not. Hell, I bought a Rolex in Hong Kong for $50 once, I'm guessing thats not real either.

We live and we learn...

http://www.wormwoodsociety.org/index.ph ... itstart=10
http://www.praguepost.com/articles/2006 ... r-name.php
http://www.feeverte.net/guide/country/czech_republic/ [see the notes half way down]
http://www.wormwoodsociety.org/index.ph ... Itemid=141
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absinthe

Author:  mzmelissa [ Mon Dec 24, 2007 12:01 pm ]
Post subject: 

hey, i had no idea... thanks for posting!! maybe ill be able to pick up some Mansinthe somewhere sometime..

http://www.mansinthe.com/

come on. i HAVE too. :lol:

Author:  thosquanta [ Mon Dec 24, 2007 12:25 pm ]
Post subject: 

mansinthe is a SUPER gay name.






i might have to as well.

Author:  epidemic [ Wed Dec 26, 2007 2:04 pm ]
Post subject: 

Years back when I was intent on orering a bottle from Czech. Rep. I remember reading abouyt the different concentrations of Thujone. I noticed that bottle ranges from about 10 ppm (mg/l) to over 75 and there was speculation that the Absinth that people like VanGough drank was around 200ppm. So at 10ppm Thujone and 90% ethanol, you will be choking on your vomit long before feeling much from the Thujone.

Author:  JeffAlso [ Wed Dec 26, 2007 4:45 pm ]
Post subject: 

Yeah, I've been doing more reading on this. I was in fact incorrect earlier when I stated that thujone is considered a hallucinogen. It's not. Never has been by the scientific community.

The whole myth that absinthe causes hallucinations, and will make you go mad was started by the wine industry in France because for close to half a century more people were drinking absinthe than wine, and collectively were close to going out of business. They claimed that wormwood, and thujone as it's principal extract, was the devil ingredient behind the madness. They still had the connections and political power to pull it off, and any alcohol containing thujone was banned. Funny thing though, sage has almost as much thujone as wormwood, and no one has ever banned it or claimed it contains psychoactive properties.

While thujone is present in high concentrations in wormwood extract, absinthe itself actually contains very little, as most of it doesn't make it through the distillation process. This is also why the 'mixed and maceated' imitations contain high levels, as they aren't distilled. This has been confirmed by gas chromatograph mass spectromter testing. In fact, Pernod Fils, largely regarded as the highest quality and most polular absinthe of the Belle Epoque period contains only 6ppm (or mg/L) of thujone.

It appears that the whole topic of thujone levels is the result of a marketing campaign by the czechsinth producers. They are actually using the old myths and falsehoods that led to the the ban in the first place as a selling feature. They are also repsonsible for the 'ritual' of setting the liqueur or sugar cube on fire, which actually originated sometime around 1998 as a means to hide the fact that their products won't louche when using the traditional preparation techniques.

The experts are almost completely in agreement at this point that thujone plays no significant role in absinthe, beyond the fact that real absinthe does contain trace amounts which have made it illegal for nearly a century. The so called 'secondary effects' of absinthe, best described as a 'hightened awareness', is likely not the result of thujone, but from some other combination of ingredients. It's actually been rumored that czechsinth manufacturers intentionally add other psychoactive chemicals to their products in an attempt to produce the mythical results.

So there are two entirely different products catagories that currently claim the name 'absinthe'. One uses 19th century recipies and distillation processes, and uses rigorous scientific analysis to ensure their product is as close as possible to the original stuff from the Belle Epoque period. The other uses completely new recipes and processes created in the 1990s, makes no attempt to produce a product comparable to that of the 1800s, and intentionally markets their products using hype, myth, and complete falsehoods.

http://www.oxygenee.com/absinthe-faq/faq2.html
http://www.thujone.info/
http://www.thujone.info/science.html
http://www.feeverte.net/thujone.html
http://www.wormwoodsociety.org/index.ph ... &Itemid=34

Author:  epidemic [ Wed Dec 26, 2007 10:22 pm ]
Post subject: 

Also at that time people used whatever they could to extract "whatever" from the wormwood. This often included methanol, or wood alcohol. MeOH is know to cause blindness and dementia.

Random note that bootleggers used juniper to spice up methanol and sell it as Gin during the prohibition. That would be a shitty party.

Author:  epidemic [ Wed Dec 26, 2007 10:23 pm ]
Post subject: 

JeffAlso wrote:
and intentionally markets their products using hype, myth, and complete falsehoods.

h


America! YAY!!!!

Author:  JeffAlso [ Thu Dec 27, 2007 3:04 pm ]
Post subject: 

For anyone interested, I'm sitting here enjoying my third glass of Lucid absinthe. There were around 30 people waiting in line outside Surdyk's just before they opened. I'm guessing they will be sold out by the end of the day. It's a bit pricier than I expected, $75 a bottle, but not terribly so. I also learned it contains beet alcohol as its base before distillation, which is the traditional recipe. No grain alcohol here!

So, heres my take - it's pretty good stuff. Not excellent, but quite good for the price. They had a tasting setup for people to sample before buying, and the first thing I noticed was that they were using pure cane sugar cubes during preparation rather than white sugar. I went with it and bought a box along with my bottles figuring that they knew what they were doing, although I've never seen or heard of anyone using anything but white sugar. Bottom line, don't do this. The brown coloration screws up the look of the louche effect, and it adds an unusual and foreign taste behind. If you're going to use sugar, use white sugar.

The flavors are balanced pretty well, although maybe a bit too bold. In my opinion it actually doesn't need much if any artificial sweetening. Disolving a whole sugar cube per glass makes it taste way too much like candy (I know, thats how it's supposed to taste...), but a pinch of white sugar after dilluting with ice water is perfect for my tastes :)

Most people seem to agree that it's really pretty good, but falls a little short of top-shelf. Considering how much Europe is flooded with imitation crap though, we're really lucky that the first legally imported stuff is a genuine and good tasting absinthe. If you want top shelf stuff though, you'll still have to order from Europe until they're approved for import.

Time for another glass...

Author:  zom-zom [ Thu Dec 27, 2007 3:08 pm ]
Post subject: 

I've read that the whole "spoon" business came much later in the history of drinking absinthe.

Author:  Jason Guana [ Thu Dec 27, 2007 4:03 pm ]
Post subject: 

JeffAlso wrote:
For anyone interested, I'm sitting here enjoying my third glass of Lucid absinthe. There were around 30 people waiting in line outside Surdyk's just before they opened. I'm guessing they will be sold out by the end of the day. It's a bit pricier than I expected, $75 a bottle, but not terribly so. I also learned it contains beet alcohol as its base before distillation, which is the traditional recipe. No grain alcohol here!

So, heres my take - it's pretty good stuff. Not excellent, but quite good for the price. They had a tasting setup for people to sample before buying, and the first thing I noticed was that they were using pure cane sugar cubes during preparation rather than white sugar. I went with it and bought a box along with my bottles figuring that they knew what they were doing, although I've never seen or heard of anyone using anything but white sugar. Bottom line, don't do this. The brown coloration screws up the look of the louche effect, and it adds an unusual and foreign taste behind. If you're going to use sugar, use white sugar.

The flavors are balanced pretty well, although maybe a bit too bold. In my opinion it actually doesn't need much if any artificial sweetening. Disolving a whole sugar cube per glass makes it taste way too much like candy (I know, thats how it's supposed to taste...), but a pinch of white sugar after dilluting with ice water is perfect for my tastes :)

Most people seem to agree that it's really pretty good, but falls a little short of top-shelf. Considering how much Europe is flooded with imitation crap though, we're really lucky that the first legally imported stuff is a genuine and good tasting absinthe. If you want top shelf stuff though, you'll still have to order from Europe until they're approved for import.

Time for another glass...


Na Zdrovya! *A Toast To Your Health*

JT

Author:  Ninevah [ Thu Jan 10, 2008 12:39 am ]
Post subject: 

A friend once ordered a bottle of La Fee Absinthe from overseas.

http://www.lafeeabsinthe.com/

They sent it as cooking sherry. It wasn't all that. A good sambuca or ouzo is better.

Something that's pretty cool and has always been available is:

http://www.chartreuse.fr/pa_green&yellow_uk.htm

This I actually felt was different than a normal drunk. . . vaguely narcotic, or all in my head.

I imagine that most of the hype around absinthe is the mythology and romanticism surrounding it.

Author:  Haakon [ Thu Jan 10, 2008 1:00 am ]
Post subject: 

So, the question is, what is the best brand of absinthe there is? What gives you the most desired effect?

Author:  skywayman [ Thu Jan 10, 2008 8:22 am ]
Post subject: 

Nouvelle Orleans was created by an American chemist who moved to France and found a vintage bottle. He reverse engineered the chemical contents and claims to have the most authentic version. He was on NPR a while back. Good interview.

Of course that makes Nouvelle Orleans a French spirit so it will set you back a cool $100 + shipping and import fees.

Author:  Caver01 [ Mon Jan 14, 2008 4:34 am ]
Post subject:  T A Breaux

Nouvelle Orleans is made by the same guy! That American chemist is T.A. Breaux, and there have also been a few cable TV features about him posted to YouTube.

Not only did he create Nouvelle Orleans, but he's responsible for Lucid as well. Breaux's Jade Distillery crafts several authentic recipes made at the old Combier distillery, in France, as you mentioned. Lucid may not be a Jade vintage replica, but Breaux has been quoted as being very happy about the fact that we are getting a genuine product in Lucid and how important that is for the future of absinthe in America. Rather than hordes of 'czechsinth' garbage, we have flavor authenticity in Lucid as the first legal absinthe to market.

Author:  JeffAlso [ Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:03 pm ]
Post subject: 

Haakon wrote:
So, the question is, what is the best brand of absinthe there is? What gives you the most desired effect?

Recently 76 bottles of <a href='http://www.oxygenee.com/absinthe-buy/vintage1.html' target='_blank'>Edouard Pernod</a> have been found that date to ~1910. Several are still available for purchase, but likely cost four figures per bottle.

From what I can gather, The <a href='http://www.absintheclassics.com/absinthe_jade.html' target='_blank'>Jade PF 1901</a> is currently regarded by many absintheurs as the best modern stuff. It's made by using the same alambics (distillation equipment) and recipe as Pernod Fils ~1901. Vintage bottles have been chemically analyzed using a mass spectrometer to ensure the modern product is a close as possible to the original. It costs around $120 per bottle.

Author:  Rockula! [ Tue Jan 15, 2008 1:20 am ]
Post subject: 

So the next question is
What about the broke ass brothas?

Author:  rskm1 [ Tue Jan 15, 2008 1:24 am ]
Post subject: 

Rockula! wrote:
So the next question is
What about the broke ass brothas?

Old Milwaukee with a sugar cube.

Author:  skywayman [ Tue Jan 15, 2008 8:20 am ]
Post subject: 

rskm1 wrote:
Rockula! wrote:
So the next question is
What about the broke ass brothas?

Old Milwaukee with a sugar cube.


I think you meant a packet of Equal.

Author:  Rockula! [ Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:15 pm ]
Post subject: 

That reminds me of a time when I was broke and tried to make Kool-Aid from packets of Sweet n Low the guy from the convenience store allowed me to pilfer

Author:  +jamison+ [ Tue Jan 15, 2008 3:54 pm ]
Post subject: 

My roomate has two bottles, one's called Pere Kermann's Absinthe and the other is Hill's Absinth. I forget which country she said they came from. I tried a little sip of the Hill's and it was fucking horrible.

Image

Author:  JeffAlso [ Thu Jan 17, 2008 1:23 am ]
Post subject: 

+jamison+ wrote:
My roomate has two bottles, one's called Pere Kermann's Absinthe and the other is Hill's Absinth.

Unfortunately for your roommate, neither of those can be considered a genuine absinthe. While the first is made in France, it's produced using the same 'bohemian' techniques used by the Czech producers. The second is from the Czech republic. They are both artificially colored and flavored. Neither are distilled, will produce a louche, or contain any anise.

Hill's absinthe is a perfect example of what not to buy. Their website claims they have been producing absinthe since the 1920's, although there is no evidence that any product claiming to be absinthe existed in the Czech republic before the 1990's. They also advertise and advocate the use of the 'fire' ritual, which again is a product of the 1990s.

Author:  +jamison+ [ Thu Jan 17, 2008 10:50 am ]
Post subject: 

Interesting. Thanks for the info :)

Author:  devil [ Wed Feb 13, 2008 4:52 pm ]
Post subject: 

The Pulse of Radio reports that Marilyn Manson's new brand of absinthe, called Mansinthe, has been panned by a panel of critics at Epicurious.com. The drink, which is manufactured in Switzerland, is not legally available in the U.S. yet. The panel rated the beverage in five categories, concluding, "Did Mansinthe have what it takes to be a premium absinthe?...the answer is, sadly, no. The Number One problem was the aroma, which some verbally compared to sewage water or swamp mud, but with the exception of a lone taster, the panel felt it wasn't really worth wading through the odor to get to mediocre flavor anyway. Sorry, M.M."

A press release described the drink last year as an authentic absinthe "distilled from fine herbs, naturally colored and not sugared," adding that Manson "was directly involved in developing this product."

Bottles of the 66.6% proof beverage cost $41 each at Absinthe.de, with the bottles featuring original art from the shock rocker.

Absinthe was first popular in late 19th century and early 20th century France before being banned in the U.S. and much of Europe for its allegedly addictive quality. It has experienced a revival in the last decade, with more than 100 brands now manufactured.

Author:  JeffAlso [ Mon Feb 25, 2008 12:30 am ]
Post subject: 

I just recently got a bottle of <a href='http://www.absintheclassics.com/absinthe_jade.html' target='_blank'>Jade PF 1901</a> I ordered from Europe. With shipping it's $165 per bottle, and it seems that distributors are often sold out of it due to limited production.

The Jade company operates of of the historic Combier distillery in France, which is also an operating museum. They currently produce 5 different labels, all produced by hand using the exact same equipment used to produce Pernod Fils from ~1870-1901. PF 1901 can be considered a Pernod Fils clone in that it uses the same recipe, process, ingredient sources, etc as the original stuff from the mid 1800s. Several years of refinement and extensive chemical analysis have ensured that this stuff is a close as possible to the original stuff of the Belle Epoque period.

I'm gonna hold off a little while on popping the cork, maybe for my next hottub party or something, but I'll let you know how it compares with Lucid.

Author:  thosquanta [ Mon Feb 25, 2008 10:22 am ]
Post subject: 

let us know if you get fucked up. :)

Author:  JeffAlso [ Sat Mar 01, 2008 7:54 pm ]
Post subject: 

Last night I had a few friends over and popped the cork on the 1901. I'm also currently enjoying my second glass this evening. This stuff is truly exquisite!

Compared to Lucid, the color is better, the louche is better, the aroma is better, the taste is better, and the secondary effects are much better! I would describe the secondary effects as relaxing the mind the way a normal alcohol does, but that it dulls the mind to a much lesser extent. Other peoples descriptions of experiencing a heightened awareness or greater lucidity are also accurate. Later last night I went to Zero after a couple of glasses, and I was still feeling the absinthe effect hours later at the end of the night.

I played around with preparing it in a few different ratios, and came up with the following:

Slowly drip 6.5 ounces of ice water thru the sugar cube and into 1.5 ounces of absinthe. The slower you drip it in the better. This produces an 8 ounce glass thats about 23% absinthe, or around 31 proof.

At $165 a bottle, each prepared glass costs about $9.70, which is comparable to a $31 bottle of wine. It's actually quite reasonably priced when you do the comparisons.

I still like Lucid, and haven't tried Kubler yet, but this stuff really does stand up to it's reputation as being among the best absinthes made. I highly recommend anyone interested try it.

Author:  Rockula! [ Tue Apr 29, 2008 7:36 pm ]
Post subject: 

Absinthe's Mind-Altering Mystery Solved

||MODERATOR NOTE: long URL changed to a link, to avoid horizontal scrollbar

Author:  JeffAlso [ Wed Apr 30, 2008 1:04 am ]
Post subject: 

That article is partly correct, and partly incorrect - at least as far as the experts/enthusiasts are concerned.

While absinthe is and has always contained a high alcohol content, it was historically never drank neat except for end-of-line alcoholic types who would drink pretty much anything. Historically, absinthe was always louched with water at a ratio of 3:1 or greater. This puts the alcohol content of a properly prepared glass of absinthe at around that of 1-2 glasses of wine of equal volume.

What is correct in that article is that thujone is not only *not* a hallucinogen, but thats it's not even present in high concentrations in historic (or historically produced) absinthe. Previous claims that thujone has a similar effect on brain chemistry as THC has also been scientifically disproven. Thujone effects are simply a marketing technique used by lesser reputable manufacturers, and have absolutely no basis in fact or in history.

So what of the so called 'secondary effects' of absinthe? First off, the historic secondary effects aren't of hallucinations, or any 'drug like' experiences at all. On the contrary, what the historic secondary effects of absinthe are is an unusually high awareness or lucidity for the amount of alcohol consumed. I describe this as the mind being relaxed to the same extent as other alcohol, but being dulled to a much lesser extent.

To date, no one has published a peer reviewed scientific paper on what gives historic (or historically produced) absinthe its unique effect, likely because theres no grant money in doing so. The consensus among connoisseurs is that the effect is simply the result of it being made from different ingredients. Beer, Wine, Whiskey, Tequila, etc all have subtle differences in their effect simply due to their being produced from different ingredients. Absinthe is no different. It's not a drug, a magic elixir, or anything like that. It's simply a unique, complex, and extremely tasty herbal liquor with a slightly different effect than other alcohols.

Below is a link to the scientific paper that will be published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry on 5/14/2008, and referenced in the article Rockula provided concerning thujone content in histroic absinthe:
http://www.thujone.info/thujone-absinthe-39.html

Author:  epidemic [ Wed Apr 30, 2008 8:09 am ]
Post subject: 

Another Link To The Same Article

||MODERATOR NOTE: long url replaced with link. It's the exact same article Rockula! already linked to. SO?

Author:  JeffAlso [ Sun May 04, 2008 2:17 pm ]
Post subject: 

I recently ran across a <a href='http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wqW1IgSKmI&feature=related' target='_blank'>video</a> from a Modern Marvels episode of the History channel on youtube. It's a 10 minute documentary piece on the history of absinthe.

This was made awhile back, before the US ban was lifted, and before the publication of the more recent scientific studies, but it's a great piece anyone interested should check out. It features T. A. Breaux, who's regarded as one of the worlds foremost expert on the production of absinthe, and the President of Jade liquors.

--- EDIT ---

On hearing that the very last bottle of the 'Palazzo' cache of 50 bottles of Pernod Fils from 1910 was being sold as individualized glass sized samples, I decided it was finally time to purchase a pre-ban absinthe. Since intact bottles of PF have gone for $5000 or more, I'm really excited that they decided to pop the cork on the last bottle and sell it more affordably. Theres no telling if/when another cache of Pernod Fils will ever be found again, so getting in on the last known available bottle is just super cool!

I'm probably going to sit on it for awhile, and continue to try various other modern brands and let my palette mature so that I can get the most out of drinking it. They say there are only a few thousand people world-wide who have tasted a pre-ban absinthe. I'll soon be joining their ranks!

YAY!!

Author:  alisgray [ Wed Jun 04, 2008 11:39 am ]
Post subject: 

http://www.trendhunter.com/trends/absinthe-gummi-bears

Author:  epidemic [ Wed Jun 04, 2008 12:33 pm ]
Post subject: 

JeffAlso wrote:

I'm probably going to sit on it for awhile, and continue to try various other modern brands and let my palette mature so that I can get the most out of drinking it. They say there are only a few thousand people world-wide who have tasted a pre-ban absinthe. I'll soon be joining their ranks!

YAY!!


I'd take a few microliters and throw it on a GC. I'd be curious to see the MeOH content.

Author:  Ether [ Tue Jul 08, 2008 7:45 am ]
Post subject: 

Recently had some with friends. It was fun, and it's been a while since I've had the real stuff so it was fun to revisit it. I enjoyed it, but I can see how it's not for everyone. I compare the buzz to a cross between being high and drunk, and you're right in saying it is subtle. The ritual of the sugarcube and the spoon is very fun and my favorite part.

We came up with the idea of mixing it into a Mojito... I think that might be yummy. I'll try it sometime and let y'all know how it goes.

~Ether~

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