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 Writing An Article On The MPLS Scene... 
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Joined: Tue Sep 30, 2008 4:16 pm
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Post Writing An Article On The MPLS Scene...
Hey.

Many of you (I feel it must be many of you though I don't recognise usernames here much other than Jonathan's Blue Harlequin-ness) know me; Sarah Moeding, vocalist of milkbar. I've been around and have known y'all the better part of the last decade.

Silly I haven't joined 'til now, but I need your help. I am working on an article, a cover story in fact, on the local goth scene. I would appreciate any help about upcoming events, thoughts and feelings on how things have changed in the last five to ten years, what your opinions are of The Chamber vs. Bondage a Go-Go, etc. This piece will be deadlined next week, so I'm putting it together rather fast. Especially important at this moment is finding photo ops before the weekend is through.

Any help at all would be appreciated and I'd welcome messages in any format, in this forum or to my email at curmudgeonlytaco@gmail.com

Thanks,
-Sarah.


Tue Sep 30, 2008 4:30 pm
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We get a few Goths at Crypticon, I wouldn't say a TON, but they tend to fit in with our "Horror" theme

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Tue Sep 30, 2008 5:12 pm
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Post Re: Writing An Article On The MPLS Scene...
Möding wrote:
Especially important at this moment is finding photo ops before the weekend is through.

Well, the Voltaire show on Sunday oughta fit the bill nicely.
Make sure to get a couple panoramic shots of the smokers huddled out front.


Tue Sep 30, 2008 5:30 pm
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Post Re: Writing An Article On The MPLS Scene...
rskm1 wrote:
Möding wrote:
Especially important at this moment is finding photo ops before the weekend is through.

Well, the Voltaire show on Sunday oughta fit the bill nicely.
Make sure to get a couple panoramic shots of the smokers huddled out front.


I just noticed this event about fifteen minutes ago! Shame on Jonathan for not mentioning it to me when I was discussing the topic with him a mere hour prior... Has he no sense of self promotion!?!? :wink:


Tue Sep 30, 2008 5:38 pm
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Post Re: Writing An Article On The MPLS Scene...
Möding wrote:
Shame on Jonathan for not mentioning it to me when I was discussing the topic with him a mere hour prior... Has he no sense of self promotion!?!? :wink:

Probably modesty.
Or senility.


Tue Sep 30, 2008 5:56 pm
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Post Re: Writing An Article On The MPLS Scene...
rskm1 wrote:
Möding wrote:
Shame on Jonathan for not mentioning it to me when I was discussing the topic with him a mere hour prior... Has he no sense of self promotion!?!? :wink:

Probably modesty.
Or senility.


He is getting pretty old.


Tue Sep 30, 2008 6:23 pm
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Post Re: Writing An Article On The MPLS Scene...
Möding wrote:
He is getting pretty old.


Getting?


Tue Sep 30, 2008 6:33 pm
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Post Re: Writing An Article On The MPLS Scene...
Möding wrote:
Hey.

Many of you (I feel it must be many of you though I don't recognise usernames here much other than Jonathan's Blue Harlequin-ness) know me; Sarah Moeding, vocalist of milkbar. I've been around and have known y'all the better part of the last decade.

Silly I haven't joined 'til now, but I need your help. I am working on an article, a cover story in fact, on the local goth scene. I would appreciate any help about upcoming events, thoughts and feelings on how things have changed in the last five to ten years, what your opinions are of The Chamber vs. Bondage a Go-Go, etc. This piece will be deadlined next week, so I'm putting it together rather fast. Especially important at this moment is finding photo ops before the weekend is through.

Any help at all would be appreciated and I'd welcome messages in any format, in this forum or to my email at curmudgeonlytaco@gmail.com

Thanks,
-Sarah.


Out of bland curiosity, why are you writing this article?


Wed Oct 01, 2008 2:22 am
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Just don't ask John Sandford about the local goth scene.

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Wed Oct 01, 2008 9:03 am
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edentropy wrote:
The official Eddie Entropy sponsored blog "Worship the Zero" will have all the information you require regarding the local gothic music scene!

http://www.edentropy.blogspot.com


This has absolutely nothing to do with Goth. It's also incredibly stupid.


Wed Oct 01, 2008 11:40 am
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edentropy wrote:
The official Eddie Entropy sponsored blog "Worship the Zero" will have all the information you require regarding the local gothic music scene!

I am quite sure it will not.


Wed Oct 01, 2008 1:29 pm
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Post Re: Writing An Article On The MPLS Scene...
Liighter wrote:
Möding wrote:
Hey.

Many of you (I feel it must be many of you though I don't recognise usernames here much other than Jonathan's Blue Harlequin-ness) know me; Sarah Moeding, vocalist of milkbar. I've been around and have known y'all the better part of the last decade.

Silly I haven't joined 'til now, but I need your help. I am working on an article, a cover story in fact, on the local goth scene. I would appreciate any help about upcoming events, thoughts and feelings on how things have changed in the last five to ten years, what your opinions are of The Chamber vs. Bondage a Go-Go, etc. This piece will be deadlined next week, so I'm putting it together rather fast. Especially important at this moment is finding photo ops before the weekend is through.

Any help at all would be appreciated and I'd welcome messages in any format, in this forum or to my email at curmudgeonlytaco@gmail.com

Thanks,
-Sarah.


Out of bland curiosity, why are you writing this article?


It's something the publication I am working for was interested in having a piece put together about. Simple as that.


Wed Oct 01, 2008 2:03 pm
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I could possibly help to fill you in on the early days..


Wed Oct 01, 2008 2:04 pm
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zom-zom wrote:
I could possibly help to fill you in on the early days..


Any help is welcomed. Write me an email; curmudgeonlytaco@gmail.com


Wed Oct 01, 2008 2:14 pm
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zom-zom wrote:
edentropy wrote:
The official Eddie Entropy sponsored blog "Worship the Zero" will have all the information you require regarding the local gothic music scene!

http://www.edentropy.blogspot.com


This has absolutely nothing to do with Goth. It's also incredibly stupid.


i wish someone would have warned me earlier. CRAP. lesson learned.


Wed Oct 01, 2008 2:18 pm
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wow. an article that is actually pretty decent... good job!

http://www.vita.mn/story.php?id=31081439


Thu Oct 16, 2008 11:47 am
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huh. i agree. nice job, sarah! and thanks for the plug. i think others may agree that "bratty" sums up some of my behavior. woo!

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Thu Oct 16, 2008 11:52 am
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No mention of the early scene, probably has no idea about it though. I never got the time to respond. Tevs.

No Dark Carnival, Heathen, Timbuktwo. It would be nice to see some acknowledgment for the
people who were doing this sort of thing 25+ years ago.

No Kontrol Panel mention either, but whatever. We don't wear rubber clothing and play Dance Music I guess.


Last edited by zom-zom on Thu Oct 16, 2008 12:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Thu Oct 16, 2008 12:00 pm
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thosquanta wrote:
huh. i agree. nice job, sarah! and thanks for the plug. i think others may agree that "bratty" sums up some of my behavior. woo!


Nice little read for sure...

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Thu Oct 16, 2008 12:05 pm
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Looks like I just missed this. Shame. Oddly enough, I came here (I've lurked a tad before) because I just put up a lengthy sort of "Tim's Eye View" of my musical career from 1977-1992 over on my soundclick page. That includes Timbuktu (creepy in our way, yes, but not goth/darksider to my mind); Dark Carnival; and Grind, which included myself, Ian and Jeff from Heathen, Tom Lischmann from the Magnolias, and the dear, departed Scotty Grier.

I'm always pretty easy to track down via "SicTim." For example, soundclick.com/sictim, delicious.com/sictim, etc.

I'm still going to make a fresh post about the page -- seriously, I'm curious to know what fresh ears might hear coming from my jaded and medication-addled brain these days, and if they dig it at all -- but I feel sort of bad I missed the query on this one.

If anyone has questions for me, I'd be happy to answer to the best of my abilities. Sic[AT]graphicacts[DOT]com is my standard email addy, although I check ssictim[AT]gmail[DOT]com more often these days.


Wed Nov 12, 2008 2:47 pm
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Hi Tim, I've tried my best to fill in the kids on the early spooky-scene around here and even linked to some awesome photos of you back when we had hair.

I don't think I ever caught Grind though, but I certainly loved Dark Carnival and Heathen. Nice to hear from you on this board.


Wed Nov 12, 2008 3:01 pm
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the article was on the current scene... as much as i loved it 15 years ago, i chose to let it go. move on...


Fri Nov 14, 2008 9:39 am
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mzmelissa wrote:
the article was on the current scene... as much as i loved it 15 years ago, i chose to let it go. move on...


15 years ago? We're talking about 25+ years ago.

I'm still making music, you're still dancing around to old disco. Don't tell me that you only listen to new stuff.


Fri Nov 14, 2008 10:34 am
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zom-zom wrote:
mzmelissa wrote:
the article was on the current scene... as much as i loved it 15 years ago, i chose to let it go. move on...


15 years ago? We're talking about 25+ years ago.

I'm still making music, you're still dancing around to old disco. Don't tell me that you only listen to new stuff.


i listen to everything... and am open to everything, unlike most people.


Fri Nov 14, 2008 1:47 pm
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mzmelissa wrote:
zom-zom wrote:
mzmelissa wrote:
the article was on the current scene... as much as i loved it 15 years ago, i chose to let it go. move on...


15 years ago? We're talking about 25+ years ago.

I'm still making music, you're still dancing around to old disco. Don't tell me that you only listen to new stuff.


i listen to everything... and am open to everything, unlike most people.


I must've missed the part about it concerning the current scene. Oh well.

Anyway, in defense of us old warhorses, the older you get, the more types of music you're exposed to. Including new stuff. For myself, one of the most frustrating things is how stagnant things have become. Beats in the '50s, hippies in the '60s, punks in the '70s, hip-hop and hardcore in the '80s... and now 20+ years of rehashing it all. Yes, I like a lot of newer music, but I feel the younger generation are missing out on something that made all of those scenes so special -- the feeling of being part of something entirely new and different and dangerous. And not just belonging to it, but making it up as we went. What exactly did Devo and Motorhead have in common?

We even had our own clothing store here, "March 4th," which featured a local designer [Amy something... damn my memory] selling original designs -- sort of our own "Sex" and Vivienne Westwood.

Zom and I can probably both tell you stories of getting our asses kicked because no one knew what to make of us -- from cops to bikers (did NOT like us wearing leather, until some of their kids became punks) to the infamous "Disco Rumblers," who actually committed at least one murder. Yes, I'm sure a lot of you still get harassed or even beaten -- but not because people don't know the scene you represent. We got called "hippies" and "fags" (not always untrue) because there was just no pigeonhole for early punk or goth/darksider.

And we can all gloat and reminisce some -- Minneapolis featured one of the earliest punk scenes, and The Ramones were instantly popular here, because the Suicide Commandos and the Suburbs and the Hypstrz had already acclimated us to hyper-fast, stripped-down rock with goofy lyrics. This city has often been recognized as a hotbed of creativity, especially as pertains to music, all along.

So, sincerely, if you like all kinds of music (as do I -- except jazz fusion. I'll take 15 minutes of white noise from Helmeticrononaut over 2 minutes of Chick Corea any day /shrug), and you're not already making music (I do suspect you may -- I've also found it to be true that musicians tend to appreciate broader styles), why not go ahead and start using that base to create something new? A lot of hippies ripped off the blues, a lot of punks ripped off '50s style rock 'n' roll, and both made it their own. Don't let "talent" get in your way. Early punk was greeted with a near-universal "It's not even music!" Now they play "Blitzkrieg Bop" at baseball games.

Music is cheaper and easier to get into than any time before. I spent $400 on my first bass, used and beat up. Right now, I use a $100 Washburn bought new, came with a 30w Randall practice amp thrown in. And it's a much more substantial instrument than my first. You can get a brand new Dean or B.C. Rich or, hell, an Epiphone LP II for $100 or so -- guitars you couldn't touch for under $500 in the '80s. I just saw a full size drum kit with cymbals on Amazon for $299, with good user reviews. Get Reaper, a $100 MIDI controller keyboard, and download some free VSTi synths/samplers, and you have an array of sounds undreamed of by any keyboard player back when who wasn't named "Rick Wakeman." Hell, just download Reaper and some free loops alone and you can start making any sort of music you like.

What you're looking at right now is the game changer. This screen in front of you. Instead of a full, dedicated studio with soundproofed recording rooms and an isolation booth; insanely expensive analog (AKA "electric") recording, mixing and mastering machinery; often costing tens, or even hundreds of thousands of dollars -- you can download an uncrippled, never-expiring shareware DAW with unlimited digital tracks. Sergeant Pepper? Recorded on a 4-track -- revolutionary in 1966, with Pink Floyd simultaneously recording "Piper At The Gates Of Dawn" on the same equipment at Abby Road. A lot of the classics we all know and love were recorded on 2-tracks, with much overdubbing -- two-tracks being a revolution, since previously most music was recorded on a mono deck, then overdubs were added "live." I personally remember wondering what the fuck anyone would do with 24 tracks -- even as I "bounced down" tracks on my trusty 4-track PortaStudio. Now, the only limit is my computer's RAM and CPU speed -- things which will just get better and better.

Here: http://www.cockos.com/reaper/. There's your recording studio. And here's a down 'n' dirty trick: free quality samples and loops can be hard to find. Sony sells some of the best collections -- and each CD set has full, free, downloadable demo loops: http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/loops.

Appreciating diverse music is great. Sincerely. But making it is really, really fun.


Fri Nov 14, 2008 7:13 pm
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SicTim wrote:
mzmelissa wrote:
zom-zom wrote:
mzmelissa wrote:
the article was on the current scene... as much as i loved it 15 years ago, i chose to let it go. move on...


15 years ago? We're talking about 25+ years ago.

I'm still making music, you're still dancing around to old disco. Don't tell me that you only listen to new stuff.


i listen to everything... and am open to everything, unlike most people.


I must've missed the part about it concerning the current scene. Oh well.

Anyway, in defense of us old warhorses, the older you get, the more types of music you're exposed to. Including new stuff. For myself, one of the most frustrating things is how stagnant things have become. Beats in the '50s, hippies in the '60s, punks in the '70s, hip-hop and hardcore in the '80s... and now 20+ years of rehashing it all. Yes, I like a lot of newer music, but I feel the younger generation are missing out on something that made all of those scenes so special -- the feeling of being part of something entirely new and different and dangerous. And not just belonging to it, but making it up as we went. What exactly did Devo and Motorhead have in common?

We even had our own clothing store here, "March 4th," which featured a local designer [Amy something... damn my memory] selling original designs -- sort of our own "Sex" and Vivienne Westwood.

Zom and I can probably both tell you stories of getting our asses kicked because no one knew what to make of us -- from cops to bikers (did NOT like us wearing leather, until some of their kids became punks) to the infamous "Disco Rumblers," who actually committed at least one murder. Yes, I'm sure a lot of you still get harassed or even beaten -- but not because people don't know the scene you represent. We got called "hippies" and "fags" (not always untrue) because there was just no pigeonhole for early punk or goth/darksider.

And we can all gloat and reminisce some -- Minneapolis featured one of the earliest punk scenes, and The Ramones were instantly popular here, because the Suicide Commandos and the Suburbs and the Hypstrz had already acclimated us to hyper-fast, stripped-down rock with goofy lyrics. This city has often been recognized as a hotbed of creativity, especially as pertains to music, all along.

So, sincerely, if you like all kinds of music (as do I -- except jazz fusion. I'll take 15 minutes of white noise from Helmeticrononaut over 2 minutes of Chick Corea any day /shrug), and you're not already making music (I do suspect you may -- I've also found it to be true that musicians tend to appreciate broader styles), why not go ahead and start using that base to create something new? A lot of hippies ripped off the blues, a lot of punks ripped off '50s style rock 'n' roll, and both made it their own. Don't let "talent" get in your way. Early punk was greeted with a near-universal "It's not even music!" Now they play "Blitzkrieg Bop" at baseball games.

Music is cheaper and easier to get into than any time before. I spent $400 on my first bass, used and beat up. Right now, I use a $100 Washburn bought new, came with a 30w Randall practice amp thrown in. And it's a much more substantial instrument than my first. You can get a brand new Dean or B.C. Rich or, hell, an Epiphone LP II for $100 or so -- guitars you couldn't touch for under $500 in the '80s. I just saw a full size drum kit with cymbals on Amazon for $299, with good user reviews. Get Reaper, a $100 MIDI controller keyboard, and download some free VSTi synths/samplers, and you have an array of sounds undreamed of by any keyboard player back when who wasn't named "Rick Wakeman." Hell, just download Reaper and some free loops alone and you can start making any sort of music you like.

What you're looking at right now is the game changer. This screen in front of you. Instead of a full, dedicated studio with soundproofed recording rooms and an isolation booth; insanely expensive analog (AKA "electric") recording, mixing and mastering machinery; often costing tens, or even hundreds of thousands of dollars -- you can download an uncrippled, never-expiring shareware DAW with unlimited digital tracks. Sergeant Pepper? Recorded on a 4-track -- revolutionary in 1966, with Pink Floyd simultaneously recording "Piper At The Gates Of Dawn" on the same equipment at Abby Road. A lot of the classics we all know and love were recorded on 2-tracks, with much overdubbing -- two-tracks being a revolution, since previously most music was recorded on a mono deck, then overdubs were added "live." I personally remember wondering what the fuck anyone would do with 24 tracks -- even as I "bounced down" tracks on my trusty 4-track PortaStudio. Now, the only limit is my computer's RAM and CPU speed -- things which will just get better and better.

Here: http://www.cockos.com/reaper/. There's your recording studio. And here's a down 'n' dirty trick: free quality samples and loops can be hard to find. Sony sells some of the best collections -- and each CD set has full, free, downloadable demo loops: http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/loops.

Appreciating diverse music is great. Sincerely. But making it is really, really fun.


I think you’ve made a few valid points, and I appreciate the spirit within which you wrote this. But I think you have a few misunderstandings.

First of all, the “goth”/industrial scene isn’t a counter-culture. It seems to be a “private thing.” People want to go through their normal lives, then put on a pair of boots on the weekend and go to “da club.” It’s not even necessarily about the music, as most people aren’t really interested in the various industrial etc. music that’s been coming out.

Secondly, I appreciate your call for people to make music, though the price you assert is fairly misleading as far as electronic music goes. Software still doesn’t sound that great, unless you put a lot of work into it. Most small bands that I’m acquainted with, spend a lot of money on equipment, mastering, and cd printing. Record labels also take quite a loss on printing cds, as the standards for making a cd that people will actually buy are now quite high.

It’s a funny scene: artists loose money, record labels loose money, and promoters loose money. This has little to do with “people stealing music,” and much more to do with relative disinterest shown by those in the scene – like I said, it’s not really about the music.

If you’re looking for a counter-culture check out the east-german power noise scene or the north-european EBM scene.


Sat Nov 15, 2008 9:44 am
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some of us just want to dance.

though I would also be pleased to hear more stories of the history of the subculture in the 'Cities.


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Quote:
I think you’ve made a few valid points, and I appreciate the spirit within which you wrote this. But I think you have a few misunderstandings.


Thanks, and it looks like you're right.

Quote:
First of all, the “goth”/industrial scene isn’t a counter-culture. It seems to be a “private thing.” People want to go through their normal lives, then put on a pair of boots on the weekend and go to “da club.” It’s not even necessarily about the music, as most people aren’t really interested in the various industrial etc. music that’s been coming out.


It's hard to read your feelings on that. A whole generation of weekend warriors? You seem to find it sort of depressing, and so do I.

Quote:
Secondly, I appreciate your call for people to make music, though the price you assert is fairly misleading as far as electronic music goes. Software still doesn’t sound that great, unless you put a lot of work into it. Most small bands that I’m acquainted with, spend a lot of money on equipment, mastering, and cd printing. Record labels also take quite a loss on printing cds, as the standards for making a cd that people will actually buy are now quite high.


First off, a two-word rebuttal: Pro Tools. Sure, Reaper is a different program, but the main difference is it costs at least $300 less. (I also use Acid 7, but mainly because it does a few things better than Reaper, like transposing and editing envelopes, rendering MP3s, and comes with 3000+ loops.) Most importantly, the current Reaper works as a VST/VSTi frontend, which every aspiring musician should get to play with, and supports ASIO, which means mixing in live recordings suffers from no latency or delay. (Provided your sound card also supports ASIO.)

That said, yes, if you use a DAW for music you're going to have to learn a lot -- like, how to be your own engineer and producer as well as a musician and songwriter. But you're not limited to electronic music -- I use "live" synth, bass and guitar recordings all of the time. Your friends most likely have another obstacle to deal with, too: No matter what environment you're in, miking up a drum kit, in the right room, with the right mix is a major pain in the ass and is a talent all its own -- one I'm cheating myself out of learning, but an acoustic kit just won't work in my space, and I'm an even worse drummer than I am a singer (I just can't get that kick pedal going right), so I'd have to find a drummer willing to go along with my musical misdirections.

As for cost, I broke it all down on my equipment list over at Soundclick. My setup includes one old guitar; one new guitar; a newer bass; a Yamaha DX21 FM synth; a Line 6 GuitarPort + Podfarm software; a cheap-ass but surprisingly solid Nagy dynamic mic; a Creative Prodikeys PC-MIDI keyboard with kludged Vista drivers; Acid Music Studio 7; Reaper and Audacity; a Behringer Eurorack UB802; and the most expensive item, clocking in at $250, a Yamaha DD55C electronic drum kit/drum machine/MIDI trigger (I can let it play the damned kick, and still bang on the rest of the kit manually. It also has a "hand percussion" mode, and all sorts of sounds to go with it.) Also, various weak practice amps and cabinets, although I do have an ancient Ampeg 4x10 cabinet left from the old days, just in case I ever play live again -- I mean to buy a head for it someday.

Estimated total cost, excluding computer: $800.

BTW, I heartily plug the GuitarPort or any of the Line6 computer/instrument interfaces to anyone who plays an electric instrument. USB plug 'n' play, accepts any instrument with a 1/4" jack (not just guitars -- I suspect this is why newer models are no longer called "GuitarPort"), and comes with some of the best amp, cabinet and FX modeling software around. Trust me -- just practicing is 10x more fun when you can do it through a Marshall head connected to twin Leslie cabs with an autowah and sub-octave effects. Seriously, I played almost my entire career on three amps: An Acoustic 360, a Peavey head with a 1x18" monster cab, and finally a different Peavey head with the 4x10. I used one effect exclusively: a Boss DS-1 distortion pedal -- I bet 9/10ths of the musicians here right now could tell me the color of that pedal -- everybody used one. Now I have pretty much the entire history of amps and effects a click or two away.

Quote:
It’s a funny scene: artists loose money, record labels loose money, and promoters loose money. This has little to do with “people stealing music,” and much more to do with relative disinterest shown by those in the scene – like I said, it’s not really about the music.


First off, I agree very strongly: It has NOTHING to do with people "stealing music." I remember the "HOME TAPING IS KILLING MUSIC!" logo on every dust jacket in the mid-'80s. Didja know blank cassette tapes had a surcharge added by law that went to the publishing companies? Don't kid yourself -- maybe some indie labels are going broke, but the media industry is, and will remain, fat. Sure, they may have to reinvent themselves like they did for radio, and TV, and taping off the radio, and VCRs -- you catch my drift. Already, Hulu has shown up as a viable and popular alternative to illegal sites, and iTunes is still in business.

A&R guys will get squeezed, but A&R guys aren't really the industry -- they're true believers who unwittingly lie to bands they like. My entire music career can be summed up best by the A&R person who had told us, earnestly, that we would finally find a home, AND on a truly "cool" label -- Enigma -- only to get fired and replaced with "our" new A&R person who said: "We've already got .45 Grave. We don't need you." Ha! Does THAT still sting!

For the love of God, PLEASE steal my music and comedy. At least then someone is enjoying it. My buddy Doug Stanhope was the first comedian to be the featured artist of the month on the old, free-for-all Napster. I've got just shy of 40 appearances on Mental Engineering, and I did it for free -- or rather, cynically, for some priceless PR. Dig this: I have never received a nickel from any recording of any of my work in comedy or music. It's all been live. Heck, Timbuktu and Dark Carnival each recorded more than one four-song demo, DC had a six-song EP professionally recorded and mixed -- and the worst part for me is that I don't own any of that music. Not a single tape or MP3 of either band. I'd particularly like a copy of the studio version of DC's "Baby Betrayal" if anyone has it.

Anyway, the only royalty checks I've ever received were from a book I edited and a film I appeared in, and both dried up long ago. A very few artists will always get rich, and for each one, there will always be thousands who are just as good but starve. Don't get me wrong, talent, originality, a work ethic -- those things all matter. But in music, you're competing for a job that almost everyone alive dreams about. (One nice thing about comedy is that most people piss themselves just thinking about trying it.)

But seriously, if you think the entertainment INDUSTRY is going to go broke, you may not realize how powerful they really are -- even though the RIAA has managed to (so far) get courts to allow it to use tactics which are not only a blatant abuse of the legal system, but almost certainly violate the 4th amendment, especially as pertains to MediaSentry -- aren't our computers the modern equivalent of our personal papers and effects? We may be out in the world on the internet, but how can invading our hard drives, located in our own homes, be seen as anything but a warrantless search by a private corporation?

The INDUSTRY has survived and adapted forever, since it exists for one reason: To maximize profits. Right now you can hear the gears spinning in their heads: "CDs are almost dead. Digital delivery is the future. How can we make the most money from that climate? Well, we'll save a ton on media delivery. We make one copy and sell it a million times -- like that. What senate committees will we need to lobby? How does this affect our Big Hits machine for teenage girls? Is there any reason NOT to snap up more obscure and independent artists -- the sky's the limit for distribution, but recording and promo might set us ba... wait! We could just let the artists do it, and let the ones we like as potential sales makers onto our label -- they can do lots of touring for promo and... yes! We get a cut from the touring and merch! This could work!"

"And best of all, we can throw Metallica under the bus! BWAHAHAHAHA!"

Quote:
If you’re looking for a counter-culture check out the east-german power noise scene or the north-european EBM scene.


Funny you should mention that, when I mentioned Helmeticrononaut in the last post. And, he's a great example of how the internet can change the game -- I was using Stumbleupon, hit that video, and wrote maybe the second piece of fan mail of my life. Much less obscure, but I also discovered Dan Deacon and Unknown Hinson (two more current faves) via random 'net encounters with their sound.


Sat Nov 15, 2008 2:59 pm
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